Middle School student drawing her own map

Middle School student drawing her own map

Pesach is at its core about education. Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks recently wrote a powerful article about the importance of teaching our children our history and the story of Pesach. However, knowledge and memory are not enough on their own. We must teach out children how to relate to and apply this knowledge. When the four questions are asked at the Seder every Pesach, the children turn to their parents to provide them answers. In response we turn to Maggid, telling the story of Pesach. Our question then becomes, not what we tell them, but how we explain the importance of our history to the next generation. If we dig deeper, we can see that the true purpose of Maggid is not simply to remember our ancestors’ story, but to come to experience it ourselves in the present day. This may appear difficult to implement until one realizes that the exodus of the Jewish people was a journey like many others. It began as a physical journey, but became a spiritual and emotional one that is never ending.
Middle School student drawing her own map

Middle School student drawing her own map

In order to better relate to this concept, Shalhevet and Rimon students used various metaphorical imagery to chart their own journeys, from early childhood, to the present, to their hopes for the future. The resulting artistic “maps” are each unique, addressing symbols ranging from mountain climbs, to clocks, to sports metaphors, with very little imitation despite the number of children. As such, these visual representations of their lives are both a narrative, and a representation of their relationship with the world. Ultimately, it is by accepting and understanding our own journeys that we can come to appreciate the journeys of others.

 

Personalized journeys

Personalized journeys